Wholemeal scones with hazelnuts

Wholemeal scones with hazelnutsHealthy wholewheat scones that can be cooked in your kitchen or out on a hike on a gas cooker.
Cooking time: 30 minutes, including a 10 minutes break.
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Protein bread with plenty of seeds

Protein bread with seedsThis bread is called protein bread because it has a bit of extra protein – egg and quark. Bread usually contains between 7-12 g of protein per 100 g. This bread contains 14 g of protein per 100 g. One bread contain around 21 g of protein. Healthy seeds also give the bread some chewing substance.
The bread is best eaten freshly baked. Since they contain quite a lot of protein they are a good supplement to a meal lacking in protein, such as a vegetable soup.
4 large breads. Cooking time: 25 minutes, including 15 minutes relaxation.
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Sweet corn and bean burgers with horseradish

Corn burgersSweet corn give these burgers sweetness, together with the horseradish you get an exciting combination.
Serve the burgers with a dollop of horseradish cream on the side. The burgers can be saved in the fridge for a few days or deep frozen for another day.
Makes 4 big burgers.
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Feta cheese burgers with pesto and spinach

Feta cheese veggie burgers with pestoThese burgers are juicy and have a mild and soft flavour of feta cheese and pesto.
The burgers will keep in the fridge for a few days or can be frozen.
Cooking time: 30 minutes, with pre-cooked beans.
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Green lentil burgers with ajvar – tasty and filling

Green lentils with ajvarThese burgers are quite compact and very filling. Ajvar gives them a lovely paprika flavour. Serve them with a fresh green salad with some bite in it, like coleslaw salad.
The burgers can be deep frozen and reheated in the microwave.
6 portions, or 12 burgers. Cooking time: 60 minutes, or quicker with precooked lentils.
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American pancakes – without egg

American pancakes without eggThese egg free pancakes work both for those not eating egg, or if the cupboard shelves are a little empty, and for those allergic to egg.
If there are leftovers, stick them in the fridge and heat them up in the microwave or in the toaster at a later date. This dish is quite low in protein, so make sure you add a little in your next meal.
Portions: 2 or 4 pancakes.
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Cottage cheese pancakes – for brekkie, dinner or a snack

Cottage cheese pancakesThese cottage cheese pancakes are both easy to make and quick to whip together. They work really well with a fruit salad. They contain quite a lot of protein and not too many carbs, so they work well on LCHF diets – just swap the spelt flour for almond flour.
These pancakes work really well as, breakfast a light dinner or a large snack.
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Comparison between different flours – which contains most protein and which most carbohydrates?

Is the difference really as large between different types of flours that the debates make you think? Is it really THAT much better baking using dinkel flour than ordinary plain wheat flour? Some recipes seem to think that it’s perfectly fine to throw in a cup sugar or two as long as dinkel flour is used in the recipe. I wonder…

Of course it all depends on what you want to achieve by changing flour. If the aim is to eat a little healthier, with fewer fast carbohydrates there does not seem to be a huge gain by changing stark white plain wheat flour for a whole meal dinkel flour. If you are eating LCHF or a diet restricting carbohydrates you may want to count a bit more carefully.

Plain wheat flour contains 10 g of protein, dinkel flour 13 g. That is 30% more, which sounds like a lot, but in reality it’s 3 g. Does that really make a huge difference? Comparing carbohydrates the difference is even less. Wheat flour contains 73 g and dinkel flour 65 g of carbohydrates, a 12% increase. If you are thinking about switching flour and get some proper effect, you are better off choosing soya flour that contains 37 g protein and 16 g carbohydrates. If you don’t like the extremely disgusting taste (in my humble opinion) of the soya flour, there are other options. Almond flour contains 19 g protein and 6 g carbohydrates, chickpea flour contains 22 g protein and 59 g carbohydrates and coconut flour contains 20 g protein and only 4 g carbohydrates. But, I found both chickpea flour and coconut flour hard to get hold of.

The other option is just to half the amount of bread and cookies you eat, and you solved the problem without burying your head too deeply in the flour bag! 🙂

Comparison flours, g of protein and carbohydrates per 100 g

Plain wheat flour
• Protein 10 g
• Carbohydrate 73 g

Graham flour
• Protein 10 g
• Carbohydrate 61 g

Buckwheat flour
• Protein 7 g
• Carbohydrate 76 g

Dinkel flour or spelt flour, whole meal
• Protein 14 g
• Carbohydrate 59 g

Dinkel flour or spelt flour
• Protein 13 g
• Carbohydrate 65 g

Soya flour
• Protein 37 g
• Carbohydrate 16 g

Oat flour
• Protein 19 g
• Carbohydrate 45 g

Almond flour
• Protein 19 g
• Carbohydrate 6 g

Chickpea flour
• Protein 22 g
• Carbohydrate 59 g

Coconut flour
• Protein 20 g
• Carbohydrate 4 g

Good luck with your baking!
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